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Steel Connection Analysis

Steel Connection Analysis

Paolo Rugarli

ISBN: 978-1-119-30353-4

Mar 2018

528 pages

$108.99

Product not available for purchase

Description

First book to discuss the analysis of structural steel connections by Finite Element Analysis—which provides fast, efficient, and flexible checking of these vital structural components

The analysis of steel structures is complex—much more so than the analysis of similar concrete structures. There are no universally accepted rules for the analysis of connections in steel structures or the analysis of the stresses transferred from one connection to another. This book presents a general approach to steel connection analysis and check, which is the result of independent research that began more than fifteen years ago. It discusses the problems of connection analysis and describes a generally applicable methodology, based on Finite Element Analysis, for analyzing the connections in steel structures. That methodology has been implemented in software successfully, providing a fast, automatic, and flexible route to the design and analysis of the connections in steel structures. 

Steel Connection Analysis explains several general methods which have been researched and programmed during many years, and that can be used to tackle the problem of connection analysis in a very general way, with a limited and automated computational effort. It also covers several problems related to steel connection analysis automation.

  • Uses Finite Element Analysis to discuss the analysis of structural steel connections
  • Analysis is applicable to all connections in steel structures
  • The methodology is the basis of the commercially successful CSE connection analysis software  
  • Analysis is fast and flexible

Structural engineers, fabricators, software developing firms, university researchers, and advanced students of civil and structural engineering will all benefit from Steel Connection Analysis.

Foreword

1 INTRODUCTION

1.1 An unsolved problem

1.2 The limits of traditional approaches

1.3 Some limits of the codes of practice

1.4 Scope of this work

1.5 Automatic modeling and analysis of 3D connections

1.6 Acknowledgements

References

2 JNODES

2.1 The BFEM

2.2 From the BFEM to the member model

2.3 The jnodes

2.4 Jnode analytics

2.5 Equal jnodes detection

2.6 Structural connectivity indices

2.7 Particular issues

2.8 Jclasses

References

3 A MODEL FOR CONNECTION

3.1 Terminology

3.2 Graphs of connections

3.3 Subconstituents vs layouts

3.4 Classification of connections

References

4 RENODES

4.1 From jnode to renode concept

4.2 BREP geometrical description of 3D objects

4.3 The scene

4.4 Dual geometry

4.5 Automatic connection detection

4.6 Elementary operations

4.7 Renode logic and the chains

4.8 Prenodes

4.9 After scene creation

5 THE PILLARS OF CONNECTION ANALYSIS

5.1 Equilibrium

5.2 Action reaction principle

5.3 Statics of connections

5.4 The static theorem of limit analysis

5.5 The unsaid of the engineering simplified methods

5.6 Missing pillars of connection analysis

5.7 Analysis of connections: general path

References

6 CONNECTORS: WELD LAYOUTS

6.1 Introduction

6.2 Considerations about the stiffness matrix of connectors

6.3 Introduction to weld layouts

6.4 Reference systems and stresses for welds

6.5 Geometrical limitations

6.6 Penetration-weld layouts (groove welds)

6.7 Fillet-welds weld layouts

6.8 Mixed penetration and fillet weld layouts

References

7 CONNECTORS: BOLT LAYOUTS AND CONTACT

7.1 Introduction to bolt layouts

7.2 Bolt sizes and classes

7.3 Reference system and stresses for bolt layouts

7.4 Geometrical limitations

7.5 Not preloaded bolt layouts (bearing bolt layouts)

7.6 Preloaded bolt layouts (slip resistant bolt layouts)

7.7 Anchors

7.8 Stiffness matrix of bolt layouts and of single bolts

7.9 Internal force distribution

7.1 Contact

References

8 FAILURE MODES

8.1 Foreword

8.2 The utilization factor concept

8.3 About specifications

8.4 Weld layouts

8.5 Bolt layouts

8.6 Pins

8.7 Members and force-transferrers

References

9 ANALYSIS: HYBRID APPROACH

9.1 Introduction

9.2 Some basic recalls about fem analysis of plated-structures

9.3 The IRFEM

9.4 Connectors checks

9.5 Cleats and members non-fem checks

9.6 Single Constituent Finite Element Models (SCOFEM)

9.7 Multiple Constituents Finite Element Models (MCOFEM)

9.8 A path for hybrid approach

References

10 ANALYSIS: PURE FEM APPROACH

10.1 Losing the sub-connector organization

10.2 Finite Elements for welds

10.4 Loads

10.5 Constraints

10.6 Checking of welds and bolts

10.7 Checking of components

10.8 Stiffness evaluation

10.9 Analysis Strategies

11 CONCLUSIONS AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS

11.1 Conclusions

11.2 Final acknowledgements

11.3 Future developments

References

12 APPENDIX 1: CONVENTIONS AND RECALLS

12.1 Recalls of matrix algebra, notation

12.2 Cross-sections

12.3 Orientation matrix

12.4 Change of reference system

12.5 Pseudocode symbol meaning

13 APPENDIX 2: TANGENT STIFFNESS MATRIX OF FILLET-WELDS

13.1 Tangent stiffness matrix of a weld segment

13.2 Modifications for weld segments using contact

13.3 The tangent stiffness matrix of a weld layout for the instantaneous center of rotation method

14 APPENDIX 3: TANGENT STIFFNESS MATRIX OF BOLTS IN SHEAR

14.1 Tangent stiffness matrix of a bolt

14.2 Tangent stiffness matrix of a bolt layout for the instantaneous center of rotation method

Index