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Materials Nanoarchitectonics

Materials Nanoarchitectonics

Katsuhiko Ariga (Editor), Mitsuhiro Ebara (Editor)

ISBN: 978-3-527-80830-4

Jan 2018

328 pages

$164.99

Description

A unique overview of the manufacture of and applications for materials nanoarchitectonics, placing otherwise hard-to-find information in context.
Edited by highly respected researchers from the most renowned materials science institute in Japan, the first part of this volume focuses on the fabrication and characterization of zero to three-dimensional nanomaterials, while the second part presents already existing as well as emerging applications in physics, chemistry, biology, and biomedicine.

1 Change Thinking toward Nanoarchitectonics 1
Katsuhiko Ariga andMasakazu Aono

1.1 From Nanotechnology to Nanoarchitectonics 1

1.2 Way of Nanoarchitectonics 2

1.3 Materials Nanoarchitectonics 3

References 4

Part I Zero- and One-Dimensional Nanoarchitectonics 7

2 Architectonics in Nanoparticles 9
Qingmin Ji, Xinbang Liu, and Ke Yin

2.1 Introduction 9

2.2 Soft Nanoparticles 10

2.2.1 Smart Polymer Nanoparticles 10

2.2.1.1 Multi-Responsive Polymer Nanoparticles for Biological Therapy 10

2.2.1.2 Optoelectrical Polymer Nanoparticles 12

2.2.2 Nanoparticles from Biomimetic Assembly 13

2.3 Hierarchical Architecturing of Solid Nanoparticles 15

2.3.1 Porous Nanoparticles 15

2.3.2 Layered Nanoparticles 19

2.4 Janus (Asymmetric) Nanoparticles 21

2.5 Functional Architectures on the Surface of Nanoparticles 23

2.6 Summary 24

References 25

3 Aspects of One-Dimensional Nanostructures: Synthesis, Characterization, and Applications 33
Amit Dalui, Ali Hossain Khan, Bapi Pradhan, Srabanti Ghosh, and Somobrata Acharya

3.1 Introduction 33

3.2 Synthesis of NCs 35

3.2.1 Organometallic Synthesis Method 37

3.2.2 Single-Source Molecular Precursor Methods 37

3.2.3 Solvothermal/HydrothermalMethods 39

3.2.4 Template-Assisted Growth Methods 39

3.3 Growth Mechanisms of 1D Nanocrystals 40

3.3.1 Solution–Liquid–Solid (SLS) Growth Approach 40

3.3.2 Oriented Attachment Growth Mechanism 40

3.3.3 Kinetically Induced Anisotropic Growth 42

3.3.3.1 Surface Energy and Selective Ligand Adhesion 42

3.3.3.2 Influence of the Phase of the Crystalline Seed Materials 43

3.3.3.3 Interplay betweenThermodynamic or Kinetic Growth Regimes 43

3.4 Post-SyntheticModification 44

3.4.1 Post-Synthetic Surface Modification 44

3.4.2 Post-Synthetic Chemical Transformation of NCs 47

3.5 Essential Characterization Techniques 48

3.6 Promising Applications of 1D NCs 50

3.6.1 Optical Polarization 50

3.6.2 Field-Effect Transistors 54

3.6.3 Photovoltaic Applications 57

3.6.4 Photodetection and Sensing 60

3.6.5 Catalysis 62

3.7 Summary and Conclusions 65

References 66

4 Tubular Nanocontainers for Drug Delivery 85
Yusuf Darrat, Ekaterina Naumenko, Giuseppe Cavallaro, Giuseppe Lazzara, Yuri Lvov, and Rawil Fakhrullin

4.1 Introduction 85

4.2 Carbon Nanotubes for Drug Delivery 86

4.2.1 Characteristics of Carbon Nanotubes 86

4.2.2 Functionalization of CNTs for Drug Delivery 87

4.2.3 Uptake of Carbon Nanotubes 87

4.2.4 Hybrid Materials 88

4.2.5 Vaccine Treatment 89

4.2.6 Cancer Treatment 90

4.2.7 Gene Therapy 90

4.2.8 Toxicity 90

4.3 Halloysite-Nanotube-Based Carriers for Drug Delivery 91

4.3.1 Halloysite Nanotubes: A Biocompatible Clay with Drug Delivery Capacity 91

4.3.2 Modified Halloysite Nanotubes with a Time-Extended Effect on the Drug Release 91

4.3.3 Covalently Functionalized Halloysite Nanotubes as Drug Delivery Systems Sensitive to Specific External Stimuli 93

4.3.4 Hybrids Based on Halloysite Nanotubes as Dual Drug Delivery Systems 94

4.4 Tubular Nanosized Drug Carriers: Uptake Mechanisms 95

4.5 Conclusions 100

References 102

Part II Two-Dimensional Nanoarchitectonics 109

5 Graphene Nanotechnology 111
Katsunori Wakabayashi

5.1 Introduction 111

5.2 Electronic States of Graphene 112

5.3 Graphene Nanoribbons and Edge States 112

5.4 Spintronic Properties of Graphene 115

5.4.1 Electric Field Induced Half-Metallicity 117

5.5 Summary 119

References 120

6 Nanoarchitectonics of Multilayer Shells toward Biomedical Application 125
Wei Cui and Junbai Li

6.1 Introduction 125

6.2 Hollow-Structured Multilayers 126

6.3 Multilayer Shells on Template 130

6.4 Summary and Outlook 135

Acknowledgments 135

References 136

7 Layered Nanoarchitectonics with Layer-by-Layer Assembly Strategy for Biomedical Applications 141
Wei Qi and Jing Yan

7.1 Layer-by-Layer Assembly Technique 142

7.1.1 Basics of LbL 142

7.1.2 Dipping Coating 142

7.1.3 Spin Coating 143

7.1.4 Spray Coating 144

7.2 LbL-Assembled Layer Architectures with Tunable Properties 144

7.3 The Application of the LbL-Assembled Layer Architectures in Biomedicine 146

7.3.1 Biosensing 146

7.3.2 Drug Delivery 148

7.3.3 Cellular and Tissue Engineering 148

7.4 Summary and Outlook 149

Acknowledgment 150

References 150

8 Emerging 2D Materials 155
Ken Sakaushi

8.1 Introduction 155

8.2 Revisiting Uniqueness of Graphene as the Archetype of 2D Materials Systems 155

8.3 Emerging 2D Materials 158

8.4 Remarks 162

Acknowledgment 162

References 162

Part III Three-Dimensional and Hierarchic Nanoarchitectonics 165

9 Self-Assembly and Directed Assembly 167
Hejin Jiang, Yutao Sang, Li Zhang, andMinghua Liu

9.1 Introduction 167

9.2 Amphiphile Self-Assembly 169

9.3 π-Conjugated Molecule Self-Assembly 170

9.4 Peptide Self-Assembly 172

9.5 Self-Assembly of Block Polymers 173

9.5.1 Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) of BCPs 173

9.5.2 Magnetic Fields Directing the Alignment of BCPs 175

9.6 DNA-Directed Self-Assembly 176

9.7 Directed Self-Assembly of Nanoparticles 179

9.8 LB-Technique-Directed Alignment of Nanostructures 181

9.9 Conclusions 182

References 183

10 Functional Porous Materials 187
Watcharop Chaikittisilp

10.1 Introduction 187

10.2 Classification of Porous Materials 188

10.3 Functional Frameworks: from Inorganic, through Organic, to Inorganic–Organic 190

10.4 Summary and Outlook 195

References 196

11 Integrated Composites and Hybrids 199
Shenmin Zhu, Hui Pan, and Mengdan Xia

11.1 3D Hybrid Nanoarchitectures Assembled from 0D and 2D Nanomaterials 199

11.2 3D Hybrid Nanoarchitectures Assembled from 1D and 2D Nanomaterials 201

11.3 3D Hybrid Nanoarchitectures Assembled from 2D and 2D Nanomaterials 203

11.4 Other Approaches to 3D Hybrid Nanoarchitectures 205

11.5 Conclusion 207

References 208

12 Shape-MemoryMaterials 209
Koichiro Uto

12.1 Introduction 209

12.2 Fundamentals of Shape-Memory Effect in Polymers 211

12.3 Categorization of Shape-Memory Polymers on the Basis of Nanoarchitectonics 212

12.4 Shape-Memory Polymers with Different Architectures 213

12.5 New Directions in the Field of Shape-Memory Polymers 216

12.6 Conclusions 217

References 219

Part IV Materials Nanoarchitectonics for Application 1: Physical and Chemical 221

13 Optically Active Organic Field-Effect Transistors 223
YutakaWakayama

13.1 Introduction 223

13.2 Phototransistors 224

13.2.1 Single-Crystal-Based and Nanowire-Based Phototransistors 224

13.2.2 Thin-Film-Based Phototransistors 226

13.3 Photochromism in OFETs 227

13.3.1 Interface Engineering 228

13.3.2 Doping in Channel/Dielectric Layers 229

13.3.3 PhotochromicThin Film as Transistor Channel 230

13.3.4 Laser Patterning of Electric Circuits 232

13.4 Summary and Perspectives 235

References 236

14 Efficient Absorption of Sunlight Using Resonant Nanoparticles for Solar Heat Applications 241
Satoshi Ishii, Kai Chen, Ramu P. Sugavaneshwar, Hideo Okuyama, Thang D. Dao, Satish L. Shinde,Manpreet Kaur,Masahiro Kitajima, and Tadaaki Nagao

14.1 Introduction 241

14.2 Electromagnetic Analysis for Finding the Resonance Conditions of Nanoparticles 243

14.3 Plasmon Resonance Nanoparticles for Sunlight Absorption 243

14.3.1 Analytical Calculations 243

14.3.2 Experiments 245

14.4 Mie Resonance Nanoparticles for Sunlight Absorption 246

14.4.1 Analytical Calculations 246

14.4.2 Experiments 247

14.5 Applications of Resonant Nanoparticles 249

14.6 Summary 250

Acknowledgments 251

References 251

15 Nanoarchitectonics Approach for Sensing 255
Katsuhiko Ariga

15.1 Introduction 255

15.2 Layered Mesoporous Carbon Sensor 256

15.3 Layered Graphene Sensor 257

15.4 Hierarchic Carbon Capsule Sensor 258

15.5 Cage-in-Fiber Sensor 260

15.6 Summary 262

References 262

16 Self-Healing 265
Takeshi Sato andMitsuhiro Ebara

16.1 Introduction 265

16.2 History of Self-Healing Materials 266

16.3 Dynamic Cross-links to Construct a Self-Healing Hydrogel Network 267

16.3.1 Host–Guest Interactions 267

16.3.2 Electrostatic Interactions 268

16.3.3 Metal–Ligand Interactions 268

16.4 Further Applications of Self-Healing Materials 269

16.4.1 Medical Applications 269

16.4.2 Application for Engineering 271

16.5 Conclusion 273

References 273

Part V Materials Nanoarchitectonics for Application 2:

Biological and Biomedical 277

17 Materials Nanoarchitectonics: Drug Delivery System 279
Yohei Kotsuchibashi

17.1 Introduction 279

17.1.1 Diagnosis from Tissues to the Organelles Using Nanomaterials 279

17.1.2 Current Thermoresponsive Drug Carriers 281

17.1.3 Smart Nanocarriers for Benzoxaborole-Based Drugs 284

17.2 Conclusion and Future Trends 287

References 287

18 Mechanobiology 291
Jun Nakanishi

18.1 Introduction 291

18.2 Micropatterning Cellular Shape and Cluster Geometry 292

18.3 Dynamic Micropatterning Single Cells and Cell Collectives 294

18.4 Nanopatterning Cell–Extracellular Matrix Interactions 297

18.5 Concluding Remarks 299

References 300

19 Diagnostics 303
Mitsuhiro Ebara

19.1 Introduction 303

19.2 Immunoassays 304

19.3 Nucleic Acid Tests 306

19.4 Stimuli-Responsive Biomarker Separations 306

19.5 Stimuli-Responsive Diagnostics in the DevelopingWorld 308

19.6 Conclusions 309

References 310

20 Immunoengineering 313
Yasuhiro Nakagawa andMitsuhiro Ebara

20.1 Introduction 313

20.2 Immunoevasive Biomaterials 314

20.3 Immune-Activating Biomaterials 318

20.4 Immunosuppressive Biomaterials 321

20.5 Conclusions 324

References 324

Index 327